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>>> dememracy in america. voters in the u.s. decide who they think should lead the country. one man has spent the past four years reshaping how americans see their country and how america is seen around the world. u.s. president barack obama took the wheel of an economy that resisted efforts to write it. now voters are deciding whether to stick with him or whether his republican opponent mitt romney deserves the job. eyewitness news line will focus all day on the race for president. >>> millions of americans are still voting. millions are already making their choices and already we're getting some hints about who they chose. our partners at abc news project barack obama will capture 3 electoral votes and mitt romney 33. >>> let's take a look at the projections state by state. the states in blue are for obama. the runs in red for romney. romney in south carolina, indiana, and kentucky. the projections give obama 3 electoral votes and they hope the number adds up to 270 or more needed to win the election. obama and the first lady arrived at home in chicago. the president wrapped hip h
flowers, rocks, gold, and even bugs were used to make beautiful books. >> meet the people who make sure no teen gets priced out of the prom. >> while the movie "spider-man" may make you think more kindly of spiders, getting bitten by one is no fun. i'll tell you what you'll need to do. >> coming up, i'll show you the unusual way they celebrate the new year in the land of mozart -- vienna, austria. >> and there's lots more ahead, so stay with us. >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> you might think of it as a healthy way to start the day, but you could be eating a bowl full of trouble. tyler has the disturbing truth about some of our favorite cereals. >> i think it's very nutritional. >> yeah, but it depends on what cereal. >> if you think your favorite cereal is healthy, here's a shock. it might be more than half sugar. and that's not sweet. >> it's been linked to obesity, diabetes. and when you eat tons and tons of it, you're obviously more at risk of developing type 2 diabetes or becoming more obese. >> that's why 84 popular c
hands a defeat to prime minister david cameron over eu funding. >> as the u.s. northeast picks up the pieces after sandy, barack obama hits the campaign trail again. >> bayern-munich rocked to ctor >> t p must be reduced. is calling kamins fright night. >> dge,be conservative party revolted, demanding >> when the voteasthe oositiola. men'ow par rus to tothet sen year b tse sptspoti louisuprtg sndg n bindg, iisignifint ireentyriinte anitle, mbetuethus seimt-sovnmt c silehaed tn e de y gi oseesrepaga sewtsote amg roanruh smmi lpeina b ac. hudaren's im mi w -shtrweren os ctait leaders in different countries. atsorl r lics himi. also had iran received 8biio eus 20 tstilets nkgysmro the e you. dublin would like ton roantali mhasm nd t conliteince meelffedrae,uthe ga no concrete promises. la ianutanng amefow europe can emerge from thisha wh i wt tot. >> at o01 iranil aumhe you's rotating psinc -- the's rotating presidency. >> let'chk iitou potical crespondentwho is covering t sry oheudt g--rer in europe. what can wxpt has berlinxpting to happen at these bgetas lerhi moh? haelrerl s a
reaffirmed egypt's commitment to the palestinian cause and a need for just resolution. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton helped negotiate the deal. she promised to work with partners in the region. the israeli military killed about 160 palestinians during the conflict. palestinian militants fired rockets from the gaza strip that killed five israelis. prime minister netanyahu said the right thing is to reach a lasting cease-fire but he warned of a wider military operation if security was threatened. hamas leader mashau warned his forces would resume attacks if israel broke the truce. >>> people in jerusalem are wondering if the cease-fire will hold. cohey sue gee has covered the middle east for years. he was in gaza on the first day of the offensive. kohei, why did the two sides agree to this truce? >> reporter: well, thousands of rockets have been fired since israeli forces withdrew from gaza in 2005. the israelis seemed to have come to the conclusion that they succeed the in reducing the ability of hamas to attack. and i think the influence of the u.s. contributed to bringing a
is outrageous and call for new commissions. >> berlin poser reform tested as police use force against protesting farmers and monks. for the palestinian leadership is set to receive huge support for united nations recognition of a palestinian state today, despite strong u.s. and israeli opposition. >> in europe is also divided on the move. a majority of the 27-nation european union including france and spain, is expected to back the palestinians. germany, on the other hand, said it would abstain, and britain is expected to do so as well. >> hundreds of palestinian flags flying in support of statehood. people await the outcome of the united nations vote with bated breath. many have been waiting for this for a long time. recognition of a palestinian state by the united nations. >> today is a very important day for the palestinian people. we are excited. we are happy. we think the international community will not be disappointed at this time. i hope. >> palestinians are pushing to have their united nations status of credit to that of a so- called non member observer state, which does not include vot
heroes because they stood up and said, "you are not going to take the vote away from us." some people stood in line for six, seven and eight hours. some had been in areas that had been damaged by the storm. and i just think that they were there upholding democracy. so that's the first thing that i remember about it. >> they were also there making delicious pecan tarts. because when i voted, the kids in the school were selling baking goods, and they were having a great time of it. what will you remember? >> oh, that's a tough one to say. i think that for a lot of conservatives and a lot of republicans this was a very disappointing election that opened a lot of folks' eyes to some of the deeper changes that have happened in the country, much more so in some respects than the 2008 election -- which i think a lot of folks wrote off as a one off, as a fluke, something that reflected very unique historical circumstances. but i think this election really did demonstrate that there's been a dramatic change, particularly with regard to social issues and how folks talk about them. so i think th
called up2us comes in. >> up2us was started because we know that kids all over america, particularly in our cities here, need sports. i mean, sports is such a fundamental part of growing up, and you learn so many values from sports that you take with you for the rest of your life. >> with help from the federal service program americorps, up2us started coach across america. so far, they've trained more than a thousand volunteers to be coaches in 25 states. ktrice mcneill was recently named their coach of the year. he really understands his players...because he was once in their shoes. >> it was really tough growing up in my neighborhood because they really didn't have any organized sports teams. everything was just surrounded by violence and just inner-city crime, so i wanted to find an outlet and something positive where i can be able to say i don't have to get involved with that so much and just i can do my own thing. >> coach mcneill not only turned his own life around, he's passing his positive attitude on to his players. >> ktrice is a very good coach. i look up to him in many di
's no way for us to gauge how corrupt the system is, the party is there. basically, he is telling people -- get things in order behind closed doors or else the whole thing is going to blow up. >> possibly, yes. what china's leadership has learned is that tiny little events may have a major impact internationally but also in certain countries. look at northern africa and egypt, tunisia. they have studied these processes very intensely, and they know -- they have roughly 100,000 incidents of social unrest a year. >> what do we expect -- what are you expecting from the new leadership in terms of foreign policy? >> mostly a continuation of policies as we have seen the mayan past. china's major priority to stability in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "
model is at war with life on this planet. it's at war with us." >> and-- >> there's something fundamentally flawed about a system where in order to get elected the members of congress have to rely on the very people who are lobbying them day in and day out. because that's their principal source of funding, those lobbyists and the interests they represent. >> funding is provided by: carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. th
. ♪ >>> welcome. to the story of a warrior, told in his own words. what he has to say is for all of us to hear, but especially those of us who have never been in combat. karl marlantes, a small-town boy from oregon, the son of a soldier, a graduate of yale, landed in vietnam in october 1968 and was placed in charge of 1st platoon, charlie company, 1st battalion, 4th marine regiment. one year later he came home with two purple hearts, the navy cross, the bronze star, ten air medals, and memories that screamed at him. in the late '90s he asked the veterans administration for help and began treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. two years ago he published a novel. he had been working on it ever since he came home from vietnam. "matterhorn: the story of a yung second lieutenant leading a rifle platoon of 40 marines on a remote jungle hill." critics called it "a powerhouse -- tense, brutal honest," "unforgettable," "moving and intense." karl marlantes has now written a second book, a nonfiction memoir and meditation on what it is like to go to war. read it and you will be closer than you can
countries have kicked off negotiations on a huge solar energy project in the sahara desert. u.s. president barack obama has arrived in new jersey to tour the devastation left in the wake of super storm sandy. >> obama was joined by new jersey governor chris christie, who is republican, but christie has praised the way the president has handled the crisis. they viewed storm damage by helicopter. obama will also be meeting with residents and emergency workers. >> cleanup work is in full swing on the east coast after sandy flooded cities, washed out bridges, and caused billions of dollars in damage. >> but new york city is making it clear it is back in business. mayor michael bloomberg rate in the opening bell at the new york stock exchange, which was closed for two days. >> the storm killed over 40 people on the east coast and caused unprecedented damage. >> life is slowly returning to normal in new york. on wall street, major stock their first two-day closure ine- over a century. emergency generators provided the power. most of lower manhattan is still in the dark. an unusual event in the c
wco t the "journal fm dw ibein omg u -- syrianebel face a u.s. pbeorlled rris after a video appears to sw ms ecio o prons. >> president barack oma a reblanhaenr tt mn g bk t attack in thein sge othleio bale >> and seeking clarity --ern chancellor angel merkeln w to develop renewable energy. weeg i sia wrehe lirys currently stepping up its use of airpower in an fort t deft t rebel >> opposition forces s a let pplha bnild an air strike near the turkish border. anwhile, aideo emerg of what appears te poti fite executing government soldiers. >> the un says atf the vide is autnticated, the action would constitute a war crime. >> as their prisoners cower in terror, rebels celebrate. this video is said to of been coed in northwestern syria. governmentorces and rebels have been fighti there for weeks. on thursy, rebstoed several army checkpoints. they appear to haveapred these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after tt, the fired rnd afte round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is tryin
us from the business desk. >> we've been reporting for quite a while now on government leaders really trying to attempt to wrestle with their budgets along with international lenders and it looks like this latest effort is going to drag on until later this month. eurozone finance ministers have shelved a decision on another bailout for greece until november. they want an austerity deal with international lenders first. finance ministers from 17 countries held a telephone witness to discuss the bailout. they said greece has yet to reach agreement on specification austerity measures with its creditors. the creditors include the european union and international mown tear fund. the austerity measures are a precondition for fresh emergency loans to avoid a potential default. the finance ministers urged the greek government to reach a consensus on labor reforms. the ministers will again discuss the greek bailouts when they meet on november 12th. greece is taking that pressure from the eu seriously. the government there has submitted a revitdsed draft budget to parliament outlining yet more
top story. >> a lot of us join walkathons because we have a personal connection to the cause. but as emily reports, one boy's connection is not only personal, it's amazing. >> there's always excitement when an event like this is about to begin. the crowds, the signs, the different groups with their team shirts. >> let's go! [ cheers and applause ] >> this one-mile march is to raise money for the maria fareri children's hospital in new york's westchester county. it's also raising awareness about the need for transplant donors. that's why it's so special that 11-year-old tyler is here. this is not the first walkathon for tyler. the last time he joined this event, he was just hours from undergoing surgery for a new liver. >> i was really sick, you know? so i had to get a liver transplant. >> tyler had been battling a liver disease for years, and it was getting worse. to get a donated liver, you need to be on a national list. for tyler, time was running out. the hospital's medical team worked hard to get him moved to the top of the list. even so, the wait took more than a year. >
the rest of us knew what hit us. that little speech about the richest 1% of the demise of democracy proved to be prophetic. flesh and blood americans are living now every day with the consequences -- >> my name is amanda greubel. i am 32 years n and raised in iowa. i've been married for ten years today to my high school sweetheart, josh. he's the high school band director of the same district where i am the family resource center director. we have a five-year old son benen, and our second child on the way in december, like a lot of american families we have a lot of debt. mortgage, two vehicle, and because we both have master's degrees a lot of student loan debt. >> amanda was invited to testify last summeralt a senate hearing on how americans are coping in hard times. when the state cut funding for local school districts, amanda and her husband feared they might lose their jobs. at the same minute, they were spared although her salary was reduced by $10,000. >> $10,000 might not seem like a lot to some people, but that loss of income required a complete financial eemotional and spiritual
was indispensable as crucial to the good news. >> we will get to climate change next. >> for us to say that this is what i generation and will not happen again, i think it would be shortsighted. part of learning from this is the recognition that climate change is a reality, extreme weather is a reality. >> new york governor andrew cuomo also said that 100-year storms are coming every two years. hate to bring his name up, but how or predicted this. -- al gore predicted this. >> he sure did. >> they have seeress in the netherlands -- sea barriers in the netherlands. >> this may not be a question of the sea barriers. this heavy jet stream that came through -- that is caused by some of the warming taking place in the arctic. hence global warming is a problem. >> but back to al gore. al gore did not talk about the environment when he was running for president, and these guys did not talk -- >> when he was running in 1988 he talked about it. >> when you have the mitt romney as governor running against this obama, their positions would not have been different mitt romney ndorser of cap- and-t
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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